April 25, 2012

WW2 MILITARY UNIFORMS OF THE POLISH ARMED FORCES


POLISH UNIFORMS



WW2 uniform of Polish Infantry - Private (1939)

POLISH INFANTRY WW2 marching in formation
POLISH INFANTRY WW2

Polish Infantry - Private (1939)

01  wz. 1939 "rogatywka" garrison cap
02  wz. 1937 "rogatywka" field cap
03  wz. 1937  steel helmet
04  wz. 1936  jacket
05  dog tag
06  WST wz. 1932 gas mask in a tarpaulin bag
07  personal dressing
08  leather ammo pouches
09  wz. 1933 breadbag
10  leather main belt
11  wz. 1938 canteen
12  wz. 1928 bayonet cover
13  folding shovel in a leather cover
14  wz. 1933 backpack with blanket
15  standard army biscuit
16  wz. 1931 mess kit
Polish troops (just before WW2) note French gas mask canisters
Polish troops (just before WW2) note French gas mask canisters
17  spoon + fork kit
18  owijacze - belts of cloth used instead of socks
19  boots
20  GR-31 grenade - frag
21  GR-31 grenade - concussion
22  7,92 mm Mauser 1898a rifle
23  7,92 mm ammo clips
24  wz.1924 bayonet
25  wire cutting shears





Polish Infantry 1939 September Campaign
Polish Infantry 1939

Polish mountain infantry -  Parade of Podhale Rifles circa 1936
Polish mountain infantry -  Parade of Podhale Rifles circa 1936

Militlary Uniforms  - Polish Soldiers - Ceremonial Parade of Podhale Rifles Regiment
Polish Soldiers of Podhale Rifles Regiment


 Military Uniforms - Polish Soldiers - Parade of Podhale Rifles Regiment
Polish Soldiers of the Podhale Rifles Regiment -background High Tatras Mountains
(notice the icepick?)

Edelweiss cloth insignia on field uniforms of Polish Podhale Rifles
Cloth insignia on field uniforms of Polish Podhale Rifles


Es steht ein kleines, kleines Edelweiß
auf einer steilen, steilen Felsenhöh! 

There is a small, small edelweiss
on a steep, steep rocky heights!

Not a Nazi Swastika - it is Highlander Cross badge worn on the collars of the Podhale Rifles Regiment until 1945
Highlander Cross badge worn on the collars of the Podhale Rifles Regiment until 1945



The traditional symbols of the Podhale Rifles regiment are the edelweiss and the Mountain Cross, the latter which has been part of the folk culture of the Polish mountain regions. It has no relation whatsoever to the Nazi swastikas of the NSDAP.  In fact the Mountain Cross pre-dates the rise of the Nazi party.


Franciszek Kosibor in his uniform of Podhale Rifles-1939 Defensive War Poland WW2
Franciszek Kosibor in his uniform of Podhale Rifles-1939 Defensive War




WW 2 Military Uniform of Polish Uhlan 1939


Polish Uhlan (1939)

01  wz. 1937 "rogatywka" field cap
02  wz. 1932  forage cap
Military Uniform of Polish Uhlan WW2
Polish Uhlan
03  "Adrian" French steel helmet
04  wz. 1936 jacket
05  wz. 1931 canteen
06  dog tag
07  leather ammo pouches for Mauser ammo
08  main belt
09  RSC gas mask with canister
10  wz. 1924 bayonet cover
11  folding shovel in a leather cover
12  boots with spurs
13  wz. 1931 mess kit
14  personal dressing
15  wz. 1934 cavalry sabre
16  7,92mm Mauser 1898a rifle
17  wz. 1924 bayonet
18  7,92 mm ammo clips
19  fork + spoon kit




WW2 Military Uniform - Polish Rogatywka - Insignia of Colonel
(Photo: Rogatywka with Polish coat of arms and pulkownik is the rank insignia of a Colonel.)


"Rogatywka" is the Polish name for an asymmetrical, peaked,four-pointed military cap. "Rog" is a derivative of the word and means "horn". No other army in the world has such a cap. There are two types of caps, the hardened version, indicated by "Mk.1935, is olive green with black peak and is worn in full gala uniforms; its rim color marks the unit type. The soft version was worn before WWII and during the period of the PRL, but was withdrawn after 1990. Unlike most military forces, Polish soldiers do not decorate their caps with military insignia, but rather with the Polish White Eagle, which is the Polish Coat of Arms. Rim colors have specific meanings as follows;


Navy blue – generals, mechanized troops, law corps and National Honour Guard
Orange – units dedicated to honor historical panzer troops, scouts
Dark green – rocket forces, artillery, anti-aircraft units
Black – engineering units, cadets
Cornflower – HQs, radio services
Cherry – medics
Scarlet – Military Police
Violet – chaplains
Yellow – headquarters, 1st Warsaw Mechanized Division, 1st Warsaw Armoured Division


    WW2 Military Uniform Czapka of a wachtmeister of 1st Uhlan Regiment of Polish Legion
    Czapka of a wachtmeister of 1st Uhlan Regiment of Polish Legion

    CZAPKA is the Polish word for a cap.  It was the headgear of 19th century Polish cavalry and was quite high and consisted of a four-pointed cap emblazoned with the regimental insignia on the front.  Sometimes feathers or rosettes were added.


    painting of 19th century Polish Uhlan on horse
    painting of 19th century Uhlan

    WW2 military uniforms - group of Polish Uhlans
    Polish Uhlans

    Polish Uhlans in riding formation 1939 Poland
    Polish Uhlans in riding formation 1939 Poland



    WW2 military uniform - Polish Cavalry Officer 1939


    Polish Cavalry Officer (1939)

    01  wz.1935 "rogatywka" garrison cap
    Polish Cavalry Officer - Lt. Col Wladyslaw Anders - before 1939
    Polish Cavalry Officer - Lt. Col Władysław Anders before 1939
    02  wz.1923 forage cap
    03  round cap of the 3rd Cavalry Regiment
    04  wz.1937 "rogatywka" field cap
    05  wz.1936 officers' garrison jacket,
    insignia of the 6th Uhlan Regiment on collar tabs
    06  memorial badge of the 21st Uhlan Regiment
    07  dog tag
    08  wz.1936 officers' field jacket
    09  9mm wz.1935 "Vis" pistol
    10  personal dressing
    11   wz.1936 officers' main belt
    12  leather holster for the wz.1935 pistol
    13  officers' boots with spurs
    14  officers' field bag, B-type
    15  binoculars
    16  strap for wz.1935 pistol
    17  wz.1921/22 officers' sabre


    Video of Mazowiecka Cavalry Brigade - Kawaleria Ułany Szwoleżery Strzelcy  (00:02:15m)






    Panoramic photographb of Polish Cavalry in full charge ( before WW2)
    Polish Cavalry - maneuvers before outbreak of WW2




    WW2 Military Uniform - Private, 1st Grenadier Division, Polish Army in France (1940)










    Private, 1st Grenadier Division, Polish Army in France (1940)


    Officers of Polish Army at Camp Coetquidan, France1940
    Polish soldiers Camp Coetquidan, France1940
    01  Model 1919 beret
    02  Model 1918 French forage cap
    03  French Model 1915 "Adrian" helmet
    04  Polish "rogatywka" cap
    05  ammo clip
    06  ammo pack
    07  leather webbing
    08  Model 1916 ammo pouches
    09  Model 03/14 main belt
    10  8 mm Berthier 1892 carbine
    11  Model 1938 privates' jacket
    12  Model 1922 trousers
    13  Model 1935 gas mask with leather bag
    14  calendar
    15  Model 1893 backpack
    16  blanket
    17  Model 1935 mess kit
    18  Model 1935 cup
    19  canteen
    20  Model 1917 boots
    Polish Army in France recruitment poster-Armia Polska w Francja centrum rekrutacyjne 1940


    Hieronim Dekutowski in Polish Army, France 1940
    Hieronim Dekutowski in Polish Army, France 1940

    Hieronim Dekutowski- Polish Army WW2
    Hieronim Dekutowski- Polish Army WW2

    Hieronim Dekutowski (noms de guerre "Zapora", "Odra", "Rezu", "Stary", "Henryk Zagon") was an Officer of the Polish Armed forces fighting in the Western front, and was a legendary Cichociemni and guerilla commander of the Armia Krajowa (Home Army). After the so-called "Soviet liberation" of Poland, Dekutowski went into hiding from the Soviet NKVD and Urząd Bezpieczeństwa (UB). On February 5, 1945, Abram Tauber, the Jewish commander of the UB in Chodel invited four members of the Polish underground to his headquarters.  Tauber had previously been rescued from the Nazis by Polish AK units, and often sought refuge at the "Zapora" compound.   But when the Polish men arrived at the station Tauber ordered them to be tied up and single-handedly shot them one after another.   In retaliation, Dekutowski attacked and destroyed the UB station in Chodel. The incident sparked an anti-Soviet uprising in the region.




    WW2 Military Uniform -Private, Polish Army in the USSR (1941)

    General Sikorski inspects Polish troops Buzuluk, Russia Dec 1941
    General Sikorski inspects Polish troops Buzuluk, Russia Dec 1941


    Private, Polish Army in the USSR (1941)

    01  wz.1937 "rogatywka" field cap
    02  Model 1937 overcoat
    03  main belt
    04  Model 1904 ammo pouches
    05  felt boots
    06  tarpaulin gloves
    07  7,62 mm Tokarev SVT-40 rifle






    Polish Army in USSR 1941-42
    Polish Army in USSR 1941-42


    Polish Army parade at Buzułuku - USSR December 1941
    Polish Army parade at Buzułuku - USSR December 1941

    Military exercise in Polish camp at Tockoje- Russia 1941-1942
    Military exercise in Polish camp at Tockoje- Russia 1941-1942

    General Anders and General Sikorski at reviewing stand inspecting Polish troops in USSR 1941
    General Anders and General Sikorski at reviewing stand inspecting Polish troops in USSR 1941


    WW2 Military Uniform -Major, Polish Air Force in the UK (1940-45)


    Famous Polish Ace Pilot F/0 Miroslaw Feric
    F/0 Miroslaw Feric -Ace Pilot
    Major, Polish Air Force in the UK (1940-45)

    01  RAF officer's cap with Polish wz.1936 air force eagle
    02  RAF officer's jacket, Polish major insignia on the collar
    tabs, British Flight Lieutenant insignia on the sleeves.
    03  Officers' trousers
    04  Shoes
    05  Briefcase
    06  Silver Cross of the Virtuti Militari Cross
    07  Infantry Officer's School Badge
    08  Observer badge
    09  British Navigator's wings 

    Polish Ace Pilots - Jan Zumbach on the left - Spitfire plane
    Polish Ace Pilots - Jan Zumbach on the left















    Polish Pilots - France 1940
    Polish Pilots - France 1940

    WW2 - Polish Pilots - Division 315 ‘Dębliński’ - Aug 14, 1942 Divisional Day (UK)
    Division 315 ‘Dębliński’ - Aug 14, 1942 Divisional Day (UK)
    Polish 301 Bombing Division - inspected by King George VI and General Sikorski
    Polish 301 Bombing Division


    Photo:  (Aug 20, 1940) Bramcote, UK. Officers inspecting Polish bombing squadrons in formation.
    First row L-R; Lieutenant Colonel Roman Rudkowski-the first commanding officer of the Division 301, General Władysław Sikorski, King George VI, and Captain A. Davidson, Station Leader.






    Polish Pilots in France 1940 (00:00:50sec)


    General Sikorski awards Silver Cross of Virtuti Militari to ace Polish pilot Jan Zumbach Dec. 23, 1940
    General Sikorski awards Silver Cross of Virtuti Militari to ace pilot Jan Zumbach Dec. 23, 1940

    WW2 Polish Pilots (background is famous the PZL 37 Los Polish bomber )
    Polish Pilots (background is famous the PZL 37 Los Polish bomber )


    WW2 Polish Ace Pilots - Kosciuszko Squadron-Battle of Britain 1940
    Polish Ace Pilots - Kosciuszko Squadron-Battle of Britain 1940

    WW2 Military uniform GENERAL WLADYSLAW SIKORSKI
    GENERAL WLADYSLAW SIKORSKI



    WW2 Poland - Polish Soldiers Battalion Chlopskie
    Polish Soldiers Battalion Chlopskie




    Partisan of the Peasant Battalions (Bataliony Chlopskie) Poland 1942

    01  wz.1937 "rogatywka" cap
    02  jacket
    03  trousers
    04  boots
    05  improvised armband
    06  9 mm MP-40 SMG



    Bataliony Chlopskie was a resistance movement and partisan organisation created in the mid 1940s by
    the Stronnictwo Ludowe, (Polish People's Party), an agrarian political party.  By 1944 it was partially integrated with the Armia Krajowa (Home Army). At its peak it had 175,000 members. Their first major action was during the Zamosc Uprising in 1942 when the Germans expelled the Poles, expropriated their farmland and and gave it to German settlers. After several major battles, the Germans stopped the expulsions.


    WW2 Poland - Battalion Chlopskie "Odwet"
    Battalion Chlopskie "Odwet"
    WW2  Commander of Battalion Chlopskie Franciszek Kaminski
    Commander of Battalion Chlopskie Franciszek Kaminski



    WW2 Military uniform - Major, 1st Polish Armoured Division (UK) 1942-43


    Major, 1st Polish Armoured Division (UK) 1942-43

    WW2  1st Polish Armoured Div - Regimental Day
    1st Polish Armoured Div - Regimental Day
    01  British forage cap with a Polish wz.1940 military eagle and major's insignia
    02  British officer's jacket
    03  British trousers
    04  Officer's belt
    05  Shirt and Tie
    06  Officers' boots
    07  Black shoulder strap of 1st Armoured Div
    08  1st Armoured Division Badge
    09  Banners of 1st Independent HMG Batallion
    10  1st HMG Batallion's honorary cord

    Photo:   Haddington 29.04.1943 The colour of the 10th Dragoons during the celebrations of the regimental day of the 10th Mounted Rifles.



    WW2 July 1944 England - 1st Polish AD in training
    July 1944 England 1st Polish AD in training

    WW2 (L) General Stanislaw Maczek communicating on radio
    (L) General Stanislaw Maczek

    WW2 Military uniform General Stanislaw Maczek
    General Stanislaw Maczek



    WW2 Military uniform uniform - 2nd Lt, 1st Infantry Division, Polish People's Army (USSR) 1943


    2nd Lt, 1st Infantry Division, Polish People's Army (USSR) 1943

    WW2 Poland - 1st Polish (Peoples) Army Parade January 19, 1944
    1st Polish (Peoples) Army Parade January 19, 1944
    01  wz. 1937 field "rogatywka" cap
    02  Model 1936 drill jacket, wz.1943 military
    eagle on the buttons
    03  Soviet breeches
    04  Model 1935 officer's belt
    05  synthetic leather holster for Nagant revolver
    06  synthetic leather map pouch
    07  leather boots
    08  Adrianoy compass
    09  binoculars
    10  7,62 mm PPSh-41 SMG
    11  decorations: Cross of the Valorous,
    "Zasluzonym na Polu Chwaly" medal




    WW2 Polish soldiers of the  Polish People's Army  - Polish White Eagle on tank
    Polish People's Army
    Polish soldiers of the 24th Self-Propelled Artillery Regiment.
     (Vehicle may be an SU-85) Polish eagle moderated.

    Polish soldiers of the  Soviet-backed 1st Tadeusz Kościuszko Infantry Division-July 28-30 1943
    Polish soldiers of the  1st Tadeusz Kościuszko Infantry Division-Soviet backed July 28-30 1943

    Polish soldiers of the Soviet backed 1st Polish Army Jan 1945 so-called liberation of Warsaw
    Polish soldiers of the Soviet backed 1st Polish Army Jan 1945 so-called liberation of Warsaw

    Polish soldiers in Berlin May 1945
    Polish soldiers in Berlin May 1945



    WW2 Military uniform - solider of Warsaw Uprising - Poland 1944
    partisan military uniform Zoska Battalion Warsaw Uprising 1944 Poland WW2
    Zoska Battalion Warsaw Uprising

    Soldier of the Warsaw Uprising 1944

    01  German "Gladiator" helmet
    02  Wehrmacht sweatshirt in "Sumpftarnmuster" camp
    03  Polish wz.1933 main belt
    04  Polish breeches
    05 German pre-1939 boots
    06  Ak (Home Army) armband
    07  9 mm Sten Mk II SMG
    08 German ammo pouches for MP-38/40 mags


    Photo of Zoska Battalion: Left to Right: Polish resistance fighters Wojciech Omyla, Juliusz Bogdan Deczkowski, and Tadeusz Milewski in captured German uniforms and Kar98k rifles, Warsaw, Poland, 5 Aug 1944.

    WW2 Poland - Warsaw Uprising - Little Boy - Polish Scout
    Polish scout Warsaw Uprising




    Polish Scouts Armia Krajowa Warsaw Uprising 1944
    Polish Scouts Armia Krajowa Warsaw Uprising 1944


    Polish Insurgents column - Warsaw Uprising 1944
    Polish Insurgents column - Warsaw Uprising 1944

    Armia Krajowa - Polish Home Army - Warsaw Uprising 1944
    Home Army - Warsaw Uprising




    WW2 Military Uniform - Lieutenant, 1st Polish Airborne Brigade, Battle of Arnhem 1944


    Lieutenant, 1st Polish Airborne Brigade, Arnhem 1944

    WW2 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade # 5 - Cichociemni

    1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade # 5

     


    01  British beret with Polish eagle and rank insignia
    02  "Denison smock" Mk I Jacket
    03  "Oversmock" vest
    04  Officers' boots
    05  trousers from M37 Battle dress
    06  British map pouch
    07  captured German ammo pouch
    used as a cover for a flashlight
    08  webbing, belt and holster for
    Enfield No2 revolver
    09  9mm Sten Mk II SMG
    10  AT Mk II airborne helmet

    WW2 Standard 1st Polish Parachute Brigade
    Standard 1st Polish Parachute Brigade
















    WW2 Polish Uniforms Polish paratroopers 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade

    Polish paratroopers during field exercises Scotland, Kingcraig circa 1943. These men were elite special operations troops who were called "Cichociemni" the dark and silent ones. Of 2,413 candidates, only 605 men were able to complete the training successfully, but 579 qualified for air missions.

    WW2 Cichociemni  in training (elite special operations Polish paratroopers)
    Cichociemni  in training (elite special operations Polish paratroopers)

    Paratroopers of the 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade - Market Garden
    Paratroopers of the 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade - Market Garden

    Allied Paratroopers and 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade - Market Garden
    Allied Paratroopers and 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade - Market Garden

    Field Marshall Montgomery inspect 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade
    Field Marshall Montgomery inspect 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade

    General Stanislaw Sosabowski  at Driel  (Battle of Arnhem)
    General Stanislaw Sosabowski  at Driel  (Battle of Arnhem)

    General Stanislaw Sosabowski  Commander of the 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade

    General Stanislaw Sosabowski
    Commander of the 1st Polish Independent Parachute Brigade



    WW2 Military Uniform - Private, 1st Polish Army, Kolberg March 1945


    Private, 1st Polish Army, Kolberg March 1945

    01  wz.1937 field "rogatywka" cap
    02  Soviet M 1940 helmet with Polish wz.1943 military eagle
    03  Model 1937 overcoat
    Destruction of Kolberg 1945
    Kolberg 1945
    04  Model 1936 tarpaulin jacket, infantry banners on the collar tabs
    05  M 1935 drill trousers
    06  owijacze (leggings)
    07  Soviet main belt
    08  boots
    09  German M-09 ammo pouches
    10  pot
    11  self-made spoon
    12  7,62 Mosin 1891/30 rifle with bayonet
    13  F-1 grenade
    14  RPG-1 anti-tank grenade
    15  oiler for the Mosin rifle
    16  Maxim HMG ammo belt container
    17  canteen 


    Polish soldiers - Kolberg 1945
    Polish soldiers - Kolberg 1945






    Military Uniform - Major, maintenance units of the 1st Polish Armoured Division (Germany 1945)


    Major, maintenance units of the 1st Polish Armoured Division (Germany 1945)

    01  M 37/40 battle dress, maintenance units banners on the collar tabs
    WW2 1st Polish Armoured Division 10th Mounted Rifles Regiment at Haddington 29.4.1943. Regimental Day
    1st Polish Armoured Division
    02  black shoulder strap of 1st Armoured Div
    03  1st Arm Div badge
    04  Silver Cross of the Virtuti Militari Cross
    05  M 37 webbing
    06  11,43 mm Colt M1911 pistol
    07  Officers' boots
    08  leather vest
    09  drivers' gloves
    10  armoured units' training helmet
    11  AT Mk II motorcycle helmet
    12  Mk II helmet
    13 leggings

    Photo at right: the 10th Mounted Rifles Regiment at Haddington 29.4.1943. Regimental Day




    1st Polish Armoured Division Aug 1944 (Sherman Tank)
    1st Polish Armoured Division Aug 1944 (Sherman Tank)

    1st Polish Armoured Division 1944 (Normandy)
    1st Polish Armoured Division 1944 (Normandy)
    WW2 1st Polish Armoured Division
    1st Polish Armoured Division



    Polish Navy

    Presentation of new Polish Naval Officers to President on Oct 15, 1936 Warsaw Castle
    Presentation of new Polish Naval Officers to President on Oct 15, 1936 Warsaw Castle

    Polish sailors in UK 1943
    Polish sailors in UK 1943


    Illustration of Polish sailor's uniform WW2
    Illustration of Polish sailor's uniform WW2

    King George VI reviews Polish naval regiment (UK)

    Polish Naval Commander RearAdmiral Jozef Unrug (1930 ranked Captain)
    Polish Naval Commander RearAdmiral Jozef Unrug (1930 ranked Captain)

    Jozef Unrug Polish Vice Admiral
    Jozef Unrug Polish Vice Admiral

    WW2 Military Uniform - 2nd Lt., AAA of the 2nd Polish Corps (Italy 1945)


    WW2 Polish Soldiers -  2nd Polish Corps and Mascot - Wojtek the cub bear
    2nd Polish Corps with Wojtek the cub bear
    2nd Lt., AAA of the 2nd Polish Corps (Italy 1945)

    01  M40 battle dress, AAA colors of the collar tabs
    02  American woollen shirt
    03  M40 overcoat
    04  M42 beret
    05  boots
    06  M37 breadbag
    07  dog tags
    08  ribbons of the Monte Cassino Cross
    09  2nd Polish Corps Artillery memorial badge
    10  Polish-English pocket dictionary
    11  Propaganda leaflet

    WW2 emblem of 22nd Artillery Supply company of 2nd Polish Corps - Wojtek the Bear
    Official Emblem Wojtek

    Wojtek was more than a mascot. He grew up to become an official soldier of the 2nd Polish Corp - the 22nd Artillery Supply Company.  He carried heavy loads of ammo for his unit.





    Polish Soldiers 2nd Polish Corps Monte Cassino, Italy 1944
    Polish Soldiers 2nd Polish Corps Monte Cassino, Italy 1944

    An Illustration of soldiers of 2nd Polish Corps Monte Cassino Italy 1944
    An Illustration of soldiers of 2nd Polish Corps Monte Cassino Italy

    Soldiers of 2nd Polish Corps charging up Phantom Hill - Monte Cassino 1944
    Soldiers of 2nd Polish Corps charging up Phantom Hill - Monte Cassino

    General Anders salutes soldiers of 2nd Polish Corps
    General Anders salutes soldiers of 2nd Polish Corps

    General Wladsylaw Anders - Commander of 2nd Polish Corps
    General Wladsylaw Anders - Commander of 2nd Polish Corps


    Polish White Eagle


    32 comments:

    Left-footer said...

    Polish friends will willingly talk about the war and, if they are old enough, their personal recollections, but tend to be less forthcoming about the period from 1944-1956. I understand why.

    I am learning a great deal from your posts, which are full of new (to me) information.

    Thank you again!

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you again for your comments! I am so pleased to know that you find my blog posts interesting! It is encouraging to know that Polish youth is openly discussing the war, but I hope that they realize the extent of Polish contributions to the allied war effort. Sadly, the West all to often overlooks or undermines Poland's role during WW2. I can understand the reticence of Polish Veterans in discussing the war but we cannot even imagine the terror that they experienced under German and Soviet occupation, and the complete destruction and devastation they lived through. Still, I hope that some of these Polish men and women will write about it. Their stories need to be told, and stand as testament to history. Their silence would be a greater tragedy.

    Unknown said...

    let your neighbors to the north keep their gas,keep your own forces strong

    Anonymous said...

    I just stumbled on your blog and I have to say I have found it very interesting indeed. When I was young I remember my Grandfather telling me about a Polish naval destroyer that was anchored off of Portsmouth, UK during the war. When the Germans were attacking the dockyard during the blitz the brave Polish crewmen of this ship gave their all in defending the British people and I believe they were all awarded with bravery medals by the king. I think that we in the West should be ashamed of our conduct after the war when we turned our backs to the fate of this proud nation. Your blog is wonderful and at least some of us have not forgotten the debt we owe..... Tim

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you for your comments, and thank you so much for sharing such an inspiring story! Polish heroes will never be forgotten! Best Regards.

    Anonymous said...

    I am a re-inactor wishing to work up a uniform for a Polish Military police officer and require a Police duty bage and a breast badge.Everything els I can obtain. Does anyone know where I can these items at not to high a price I hope as I am a pensioner.Reproductions are quite acceptable.

    Anonymous said...

    Hello! I randomly fell across your blog on my quest to discover more about the photographs of my grandfather and other soldiers who were part of the Polish army during WWII. As a result of the information and images in your blog, I have been able to discover what the uniform my grandfather wore actually looked like (In colour!).

    As part of our photo collection we also have a few pictures of other members of the Polish Army. As my grandfather is no longer with us, he could not tell us himself who these men were and what each part of their uniforms meant. So, in conjunction with information in Wikipedia about ranks and insignia, your site has enabled me to formulate a background for the men in these photos - purely based on their uniform. I cannot thank you enough!

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you for your comments! I am very pleased to know that my blog has been helpful to you in your quest! If you have not already done so, may I suggest that you contact your local office of the Polish Veteran's Society, Polish Library, or log onto the Polish State Archives. They will most certainly provide you with ample information and resources. Good luck in your search, and Best Regards!

    Anonymous said...

    Hi, very interesting blog, just one little correction, there is a mistake in the description of the colour pictures showing podhale rifles, they are not reenactors but real polish soldiers...

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you for your comments. You are indeed right! They are real Polish soldiers! I will correct the descriptions. And thank you again for notifying me. Best Regards.

    Anonymous said...

    What a great site.
    You are rightly proud of the Polish forces!

    I am running an all age research project in during 2013 exploring the anti airborne invasion defences around Dunfermline,Fife, Scotland.
    Polish troops were involved and billeted there.
    So far I have only one name: G. Krzywicki P/9 Polish Forces.
    On 6/12/42 He sent a postcard from Dunfermline to: Mrs Wheatley 51 Glebe Cres. Tayport. Fife

    Any help in finding out who dug and manned the trenches, built and manned the road blocks I have been finding recently would be very welcome.
    On 16th Feb we have a public event in the Pavilion where the Polish troops were billeted and we would love to host some Polish veterans and family members.

    Thanks again.
    Roger Pickering
    office@forthpilgrim.org

    Radha said...

    Thank you for creating and hosting this site. My father served in the Polish 2nd Corps throughout the Middle East and Italy. My mom was a survivor of the Nazi occupation and participated in the uprising. Both had many near death experiences before being reunited in a displaced person's camp in England.They lived to be 96 each and married for 69 years!I am in the process of writing their story. It's a slow process because of lack of good information in English regarding the Polish 2nd Corps and because it is still a very emotional thing for me. Dziekuje bardzo. Tereska Buko

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you for your comments. Your parents were truly heroes, as were all Polish fighters during WWII. It is for them that I dedicate this blog and my website, Polish Greatness.com I encourage you to write about their stories, so that their sacrifices will be forever recorded in history. If you have not already read it, please check out the book written by General Wladyslaw Anders,(in English) entitled, "An Army in Exile: The Story of the Second Polish Corps" (You can purchase it from Amazon.com)

    Anonymous said...

    May I suggest reading the newly-published book "The Eagle Unbowed - Poland and the Poles in the Second World War" by Halik Kochanski. It is a harrowing account of what Poland and the Polish people had to go through during that fateful time. Being of Polish extract 100%, I strongly recommend it.

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you very much Anonymous for your suggestion! I am sorry to admit that I have not read it, but I most certainly will now!

    Anonymous said...

    Thank you for the blog. I am a Canadian and son of a WW2 Polish Vet. My Father Kazimerez Klimaszewski, fought in 1939 in the 18 th. Infantry Division. He spent from October 1939 to December 1944 as a POW in Germany. He escaped for the third time during the Battle of the Bulge and presented himself to General Patton's advanced guard. Regaining his freedom he joined the 2nd Polish Corp until the German surrender. Relocating to Canada in 1948 he founded the Polish Combatants Association of the tens of Thousands of Polish Vets in Canada. Using this organization as a platform he devoted himself to his clear duty for the next 43 years: the freedom of Poland and the confounding of the Soviet Union. The greatest moment of his life was with is old army buddies marching in Warsaw returning their Army Unit Battle Flags to a free Poland in the early 1990's. Be at peace father and rest now, all honor is restored. One day I will return your ashes to Powonski Cemetery in Warsaw...Markek.

    Sofia Curling said...

    Hi, just a moment back I was searching for the information on military clothes and now I am here. So much information, really well executed blog. This is really informative and I will for sure refer my friends the same. Thanks

    Brickie said...

    Hi there,

    Some friends of mine found this item while metal-detecting on the Hel Peninsula. Can anyone identify it? It's made of leather with metal fittings.

    http://i525.photobucket.com/albums/cc339/brickiescavenger/Mysteryobject_zps4ee396d8.jpg

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you Brickie for your message. I am fascinated by the photo of the item you mention! But I am sorry I cannot identify it. Hopefully, one of my readers may be able to provide an explanation. Good luck in your search! Best Regards.

    Anonymous said...

    Hello,

    What a wonderful web site! The best yet.

    I grew up in and round the port city of Southampton, Hampshire, southern England - where we grew up with a large and wonderful Polish community. The city was still pretty much a bomb site until 2005, when the last space of blitzed houses was finally redeveloped.

    My Playschool(kindergarten) 'Jack and Jill' teacher Mary Barker, was a Polish lady married to a Polish Serviceman. From a tiny child (born 1967)I was made very aware of the contribution the Polish Forces had made to giving me the freedom to live my life - but also at the unimaginable sacrifice of their own country - betrayed as they were by the politicians of my own.

    Many people in and around the city of Southampton continue to talk of the bravery and indomitable spirit of the Polish Free Forces and ensure the younger generations are made aware of the unimaginable sacrifices made for them. Many Polish surnames are very evident from those who came in exile, and stayed to become locals.

    Apologies for going on a bit. As a Military Maritime and Aviation historian, I have worked within Museums and Archives, where the bravery and incredible feats carried out by the men and women of the Polish forces are remembered and discussed daily.
    The Veterans who visit the Museums gift wonderful - and privileged - exchanges of information from their lives to us; knowing that we will impart it to others.

    Over the years, a tireless force has assisted in writing life stories, collating photos and diairies, memoirs of pre-WW11 Poland and the very different, difficult life as an exile - with a great amount of recorded stories. No holds bared - the appalling and the wonderful incidents are there to be learned from.
    A Spitfire pilot of my acquaintance told me that no one could touch the Polish airmen for bravery, incredible manoeuvres and being the epitome of gentleman daredevils. I believe that when you have lost all, you give all to reclaim it. Alas...

    Here are a few of many websites of interest:

    http://www.sikorskimuseum.co.uk/

    http://www.dsh.waw.pl/en/oral_history_archive/17

    http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/research/online-exhibitions/the-polish-air-force-in-world-war-2.aspx

    http://www.swmaritime.org.uk/forums/thread.php?threadid=99
    http://polishgeno.com/?page_id=12


    http://www.ceelbas.ac.uk/ceelbas-news/events/workshops/polish-exile

    http://www.polandinexile.com/


    My deepest respects to Witold Chomicki, who fought in the Western Desert, all the way through Italy and became an exile in Britain; passing away at the age of 95 on the 9/8/13. WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you, Sir, for your wonderful comments about Polish people! It is extremely rewarding for me to encounter such positive responses, and to feel assured that there are communities around the world which are very knowledgeable and appreciative of the sacrifices made by Poland during and after WW2. This recognition and respect does much to heal the soul of the Polish nation and the spirit of Polish people everywhere.

    Please do not apologize for the length of your comment - I have enjoyed reading it. I do appreciate your comment about my blog and I am honoured. I commend you greatly, Sir, for your commitment and work to preserve the stories of the past, so that future generations will not forget. You are indeed fortunate to meet some of the Veterans - men (and women) of exceptional calibre. I have written extensively about the lives and contributions of great Polish heroes of WW2, including the amazing Polish pilots of the RAF.

    Thank you for providing URLs of some very important websites. I am sure that my visitors/readers will find them very helpful in their research.

    Though our heroes pass away, their spirits continue to live on in our hearts and minds. We will remember their sacrifices, their courage, and their motto: For Your Freedom and Ours.

    Best Regards

    Anonymous said...

    What a superb website. Thank you very much. I am trying to trace two Polish servicemen who were in the Perthshire area during WW2. Probably from 1945 to 1947. I have photos of them and will try and establish from your photos of uniforms what company they were serving in. Do you know if records were kept for these servicemen and if so, could I get access to them? It is very important to me and I wish I had started searching much earlier. Kindest regards and best wishes.

    Polish Greatness said...

    Thank you for your comments. The best source for information on military records of Polish servicemen, would be the Ministry of Defense, APC Polish Enquiries, in England. For contact details of this and many other sources, please read my blog, entitled, "Polish Greatness: Researching your Polish Roots". (February 2013)
    http://polishgreatness.blogspot.ca/2013/02/polish-greatness-researching-your_9.html In some cases, you may be required to provide proof of kinship to gain access to information. Please do not be discouraged, and do call and speak to them directly. Incidentally, I am planning another blog post this year on the subject of Polish WW2 uniforms and will provide many more illustrations that will be of great interest. Wishing you success in your research. My Best Regards.

    Anonymous said...

    Thanks for creating this site. While I'm not Polish, my wife is. Her mother is from Poland, and her father was born here in the U. S. but lived in Poland for a while as a child (his parents were from Poland). He was rather old when my wife was born and was a World War II veteran (5th U. S. Infantry Division). My wife was in Poland twice when she was younger, visiting her grandparents and other relatives. Many of her relatives still live in eastern Poland near the Ukraine.

    My wife's Polish heritage, and therefore my daughters' half-Polish heritage, piqued my interest in Poland during World War II. I'm a librarian and historian by trade, as well as a wargamer by hobby. I've read a bit on the Polish resistance and German occupation (I recommend The Forgotten Holocaust: The Poles Under German Occupation by Richard C. Lukas), and I've enjoyed reading the comments others have posted on this site. I find the images of uniforms particularly informative, as well as reading suggestions others have included.

    In short, thank you for creating and maintaining this site. Poland suffered more than any other country in World War II. The West has never truly acknowledged that. Hopefully sites like yours will help to educate people regarding the true history of Poland during the war.

    Anonymous said...

    my mother was in the polish resistance and home army ,and her brother and father too,her brother was killed in warsaw ,her father murdered in stutthof concentration camp ,when they were seperated .......mum went on to neugamme concentration camp then bergen belsen were she was liberated from ,she told me many horrific things that happened in both the resistance, and the camps ,..... also our brave polish father was captured by the russians ,tortured in a gulag for 18 months ,escaped ,then joined anders army ,trained in scotland to be a paratrooper at arnhem also had horrific experiences ,met mum in a dp camp married and both settled in sheffield ,and lived until their 80s ,we are 4 very proud children.but sad always, for what they and others had suffered and endured ...my grandad hid a jewish man in their warsaw home ,he came back to thank my grandad after the war, but sadly he was told grandad had been shot ,murdered at stutthof ,i have met survivors and liberators of the 2nd world war who many have told me things they have never told anyone before , after sometimes tears, i always thank them with a hug and handshake ..we will never ever forget them..

    Anonymous said...

    Hello there,
    Thanks for the great pics and information.
    My father was a cavalery officer (DSP) during wwii, and he told me various things about his uniform. But unfortunately could not find someone to make a good reproductions. Could you help me to find a good one

    Polish Greatness said...

    Hello Sir, Thank you very much for your comments about this blog post! It is a great honor that your father was a cavalry officer (DSP) in World War II. I do not know anybody personally who could reproduce these uniforms. But may I suggest you contact the administrator of the following link, which belongs to the WW2 Polish Army Historical Association. I am sure somebody can give you referrals. Please copy and paste this URL in your browser. And good luck in your search! http://12lancers.com/index.php

    Valerie Litman said...

    Such a moving reading about the Polish soldiers. My husband's brother in law - Jakub Bruen (31166 Lance Corporal) served with Polish Land Forces Abroad (under British Command) from September 1941 to May 1948. He received 4 medals. He wore an army band with yellow round badge in the middle. I would like to know if the upper band should be white or black and the bottom band should be red? Please clarify for me with a grateful thanks.

    Polish Greatness said...

    Hello Valerie. Thank you very much for your message. I enjoy receiving feedback and information from my readers! I would be very interested to see a photograph of the armband you mentioned. If you can email it to me at polishgreatness@gmail.com I will check with my sources and reply to you as soon as possible. Thank you again for your interest in my blog posts! Best Regards

    Anonymous said...

    An informative site. I have a Polish uniform that I cannot identify. Can I send you pics? The cap has a black band and 4 stars as does the shoulder straps. I am told it is for a civilian though.

    Anonymous said...

    Hi, very interesting blog, Lately I spent so much time read the fascinated stories .Thank you , we will never forget them.. God bless you.

    Michael Clazie said...

    Great site with ref to Poles in ww2 my father who i have been collecting information on was in the 1st armoured regt and died on hill 262 at the BATTLE OF FALISE in Normandy on the 20th august 1944 i was 7 months old at the time i recieved a lot of info from a gentleman in London who gave me some help he was Mr STANISLAW GRABOWSKI an officer in the same regiment he gave me information with ref to the yearly rememberence on hill 262 at Coudehard in normandy which attended some years ago which was a very moving experience, the said genleman has since passed away god rest him if any one is interested i have some photos taken on my visit i intend to make one more return if health permits next august my father had emigrated to Argentina in 1929 as many Poles did in those pre war years, but when called upon to help free there country returned to Britain to help but it never was freed in fact i did not know that on the V.E parade in London the only troops that did not take part was these brave men as they had no country my father and his comarades are remembered on a meorial to the 1st and 2nd armoured regt,s in Duns park on the eastern Scottish border,s i am now trying to locate a book recently translated from french to english with ref to hill 262 in august 1944 any help would be appreciated i recieved a couple of photos and his medals from the Polish war office but presume may have closed down now i am still looking for regt,ll photos will purchase if any one has any thing with ref toTHE 1ST+2ND POLISH ARMOURED regts Mick c.

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